Issue #11: Power and privilege can serve, not destroy

This is singularly the most powerful podcast I heard in 2018. It only takes about 16 minutes of your time, and can be heard while walking, driving, or taking the train home. Do it.

The #MeToo movement gained viral momentum via Hollywood last year, but it has been ongoing since 2006.

That’s 12 years. 12 years of crusade against injustice, contempt and prejudice on a global scale. 12 years of baring yourself naked, facing personal internal demons and sharing private tales of sexual abuse in public over and over again. 12 years of carrying the stories of others who come forward to share their own stories, many for the first time, many seeking aid or comfort. 12 years of vulnerability, strength, emotional yoyo-ing and weight.

Tarana Burke speaks of the numbness she feels with bone-tired honesty. In that lucidity she delivers powerful truths and actionable messages relevant to all of us — because they deal with basic human principles, bevcause they talk about what we all can do, because what we choose to do or not do will shape the world in which our children and future selves will live in.

“Power and privilege doesn't always have to destroy and take. It can be used to serve and build.”

Education and health are both privileges easily taken for granted.

My parents both had childhoods marked by poverty, hunger and the struggles of earning enough to stay alive. All that I have and am stemmed from their sacrifices and work to change their situations. I do not forget that. Multiple physical and emotional conditions also remind me daily how sweet it is to be able to savour health.

What we see as “normal” and everyday are in fact abilities that can empower change. And what we choose to change through our every action and choice, will leave impact on others.

Forget didacticism. Forget bipolarities. Forget emotionally charged entangles.

But may we remember basic humanity, possibility, and what can transpire from vision, tenacity, and movement.

“The most powerful movements have always been built around what's possible, not just claiming what is right now. Trauma halts possibility. Movement activates it. Movements create possibility, and they are built on vision.”


Xy Lim